A view of the Oceti Sakowin camp, north of the Cannonball River, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

The Army Corps of Engineers has decided to deny a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
The decision essentially halts the construction on the 1,172-mile oil pipeline about half a mile south of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The decision is also a victory for the thousands of demonstrators across the country who flocked to North Dakota in protest.
“Our prayers have been answered,” National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby said in a statement. “This isn’t over, but it is enormously good news. All tribal peoples have prayed from the beginning for a peaceful solution, and this puts us back on track.”
Jo-Ellen Darcy, the the Army’s assistant secretary for civil works, said after talking with tribal officials and hearing their concerns that the pipeline could affect the drinking water, it became “clear that there’s more work to do.”
“The best way to complete that …
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