Lake Nona, Fla., November 23, 2017 – A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) identifies a signaling pathway that is essential for angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. The findings, published in Nature Communications, may improve current strategies to improve blood flow in ischemic tissue, such as that found in atherosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes.
“Our research shows that the formation of fully functional blood vessels requires activation of protein kinase Akt by a protein called R-Ras, and this mechanism is necessary for the formation of the hallow structure, or lumen, of a blood vessel.” says Masanobu Komatsu, Ph.D., associate professor at SBP’s Lake Nona campus. “The findings are important because they shed new light on the biological process needed to increase blood flow in ischemic tissues.”
Previous efforts to treat ischemia by creating new blood vessels have …
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